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Wednesday, April 22, 2020 | History

4 edition of Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster found in the catalog.

Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster

Dan L. Lindsley

Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster

  • 60 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Carnegie Institute of Washington in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Animal mutation.,
  • Drosophila melanogaster.,
  • Insects -- Genetics

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDan L. Lindsley and E. H. Grell.
    SeriesPublication / Carnegie Institution of Washington -- no. 627
    ContributionsGrell, E. H., 1932-, Carnegie Institution of Washington.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH431 .L427
    The Physical Object
    Pagination471 p. :
    Number of Pages471
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16534253M
    ISBN 100872796388
    OCLC/WorldCa256180324


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Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster by Dan L. Lindsley Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genetic Variations of Drosophila Melanogaster by Dan L. Lindsley (Author), E. Grell (Author) out of 5 stars 7 ratingsCited by: Genetic Variations of Drosophila Melanogaster Hardcover – January 1, by Dan L. Lindsley; E. Grell (Author)3/5(7). Grell, E. H., ; Bridges, Calvin B. (Calvin Blackman), Mutants of Drosophila melanogaster Bookplateleaf Boxid IA Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster book Sony Alpha-A (Control) Collection_set trent External-identifier urn:oclc:record Foldoutcount 0 Identifier geneticvariationlind Identifier-ark ark://t24c0vw5s Invoice Lccn Pages:   Book Reviews Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster.

Dan L. Lindsley and E. Grell. Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster book Institution of Washington, Washington, D.C., 11 + pp., illus. $ by: 2. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: "Revised from The mutants of Drosophila melanogaster [by] Calvin B.

Bridges and Katherine F. Brehme.". The volume is an up-to-date revision of Lindsley and Grell's work, Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster. The new edition contains Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster book descriptions of normal and mutant genes including phenotypic, cytological, molecular, and bibliographic information.

In addition, it describes thousands of recorded chromosome. The volume is an up-to-date revision of Lindsley and Grell's work, Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster.

The new edition contains complete descriptions of normal and mutant genes including phenotypic, cytological, molecular, and bibliographic Edition: 1. Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster [] Lindsley, Dan L Grell, E.

Biology Division. [Corporate Author] Oak Ridge National Laboratory [Corporate Author]Cited by:   These D. melanogaster lines have previously been used to measure natural genetic variation in resistance to S.

marcescens infection (Lazzaro et al. ), and their generation is described in detail in the supplemental information to Lazzaro et al.

Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster book lines have been genotyped for insertion/deletion Cited by: Drosophila melanogaster natural populations show considerable show considerable genetic variation in different geographicc regions.

The nature of this variations suggests that the evolutionary history of the species involved the spreading of ancestral Afrotropical populations through Eurasia and, more recently, to America and by: The volume is an up-to-date revision of Lindsley and Grell's work, Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster.

The new edition contains complete descriptions of normal and mutant genes including phenotypic, cytological, molecular, and bibliographic by: Behavioral Genetics of the Fly (Drosophila Melanogaster) - edited by Josh Dubnau June Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

Behavioral Genetics of the Fly D.B. () Common genetic variation and human traits. N Engl J Med (17): – Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lindsley, Dan L., Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster.

[Washington. ?] (OCoLC) Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster [by] Dan L. Lindsley and E. Grell. Format Book Published Washington, D.C.

Carnegie Institution of Washington, Description p. illus. 29 cm. Other contributors Grell, E. H., Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster book, Calvin B. (Calvin Blackman), Mutants of Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster book melanogaster. A pioneer of genetics research in the first half of the twentieth century, Thomas Morgan won the Nobel Prize in for research that he had begun in with the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster).

Genetic variation influencing levels of gene expression is abundant in natural populations, and may exert its effects through complex mechanisms that depend on an organism’s genetic background and the tissue in which expression is measured.

We investigated natural variation in gene expression in the Malpighian tubules of three inbred Drosophila melanogaster strains and their Cited by: 1. C.J. O'Kane, in Encyclopedia of Genetics, Of the many organisms studied by geneticists in the twentieth century, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has become one of the most widely used.

It is small (adults a few mm long), fecund (hundreds of progeny from a single female), a rapid breeder (generation time about 10 days), innocuous, and an undemanding laboratory pet. We identified the causal genetic variation for the difference in the thoracic trident pigmentation intensity between two wild-derived strains of Drosophila was found to be the difference in expression level of ebony, which codes for an enzyme in the melanin-synthesis pathway and has pleiotropic effects on vision and by:   Some of these effects are caused by structural variations containing genes.

Large structural variations represent a significant amount of the genetic diversity within a population. We used a global sampling of Drosophila melanogaster (Ithaca, Zimbabwe, Beijing, Tasmania, and Netherlands) to represent diverse populations within the by: 6.

Dedicated to the memory of George Lefevre in recognition of his exhaustive cytogenetic analysis of the X chromosome, The Genome of Drosophila melanogaster is the complete compendium of what is known about the genes and chromosomes of this widely used model organism.

The volume is an up-to-date revision of Lindsley and Grell's work, Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster. The Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a community resource charting the molecular and phenotypic variation in fully sequenced fruitfly strains derived from a single.

This book contains 12 chapters divided into two sections. Section 1 is "Drosophila - Model for Genetics." It covers introduction, chromosomal polymorphism, polytene chromosomes, chromosomal inversion, chromosomal evolution, cell cycle regulators in meiosis and nongenetic transgenerational inheritance in Drosophila.

It also includes ecological genetics, wild-type strains, morphometric Author: Farzana Khan Perveen. Mackay TF, Langley CH. Molecular and phenotypic variation in the achaete-scute region of Drosophila melanogaster.

Nature. Nov 1; ()– Mackay TF, Lyman RF, Hill WG. Polygenic mutation in Drosophila melanogaster: non-linear divergence among unselected strains. Genetics. Feb; (2)– [PMC free article]Cited by: It was nearly years ago that Thomas H. Morgan reported the identification of the white gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

Genetic approaches dominated the first 50 years of research in Drosophila (–), concentrating on dissecting the principles of inheritance. In this period, important concepts and tools were developed that allowed Author: Farzana Khan Perveen. The work by Lindsley and Grell is a milestone for drosophila genetics.

All serious geneticists know this book and admire and respect the accomplishment it represents. While Mr. Frank's review is doubtless intended to be funny, it is not. It is simply disrespectful of the memory of these scientists.3/5. Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster. MLA Citation.

Lindsley, Dan L. and Grell, E. and Bridges, Calvin B. Genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster [by] Dan L. Lindsley and E. Grell [Washington. Australian/Harvard Citation. Variation of three morphological traits (thorax length, wing length and sternopleural bristle number) was examined in Drosophila melanogaster reared on Cited by:   The volume is an up-to-date revision of Lindsley and Grell's work, Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster.

The new edition contains complete descriptions of 5/5(2). Life Cycle. A major advantage of using D. melanogaster and related species as model systems is their particularly short life cycle, which allows for the rapid generation of large numbers of progeny to use in genetic crosses (Ashburner ).In D.

melanogaster, the process of developing from a fertilized egg to adult requires on average only 9–10 days at 25°; however, temperature can greatly Cited by: Drosophila guide: a guide to introductory studies of the genetics and cytology of Drosophila melanogaster, with an appendix containing a series of experiments to be conducted by the beginning student / ([Washington, D.C.: Carnegie Institution of Washington, ]), by M.

Demerec, Berwind Petersen Kaufmann, and Carnegie Institution of. Drosophila melanogaster has played a pivotal role in the development of modern population genetics. However, many basic questions regarding the demographic and adaptive history of this species remain unresolved. We report the genome sequencing of wild-derived strains of D.

melanogaster, representing 22 population samples from the sub-Saharan ancestral range of this Cited by:   Huang, W. et al. Natural variation in genome architecture among Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel lines.

Genome Res. 24, – (). CASCited by:   Latitudinal, genetic variation in body size is a commonly observed phenomenon in many invertebrate species and is shaped by natural selection.

In this study, we use a Cited by: Here, we quantified variation in life span in males and females reared in 3 thermal environments for the sequenced, inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and an advanced intercross outbred population derived from a subset of DGRP lines.

Quantitative genetic analyses of life span and the micro-environmental Author: Wen Huang, Terry Campbell, Mary Anna Carbone, W.

Elizabeth Jones, Desiree Unselt, Robert R. Anhol. Dedicated to the memory of George Lefevre in recognition of his exhaustive cytogenetic analysis of the X chromosome, The Genome of Drosophila melanogaster is the complete compendium of what is known about the genes and chromosomes of this widely used model organism.

The volume is an up-to-date revision of Lindsley and Grell's work, Genetic Variations of Drosophila melanogaster.5/5(2). The genome of Drosophila melanogaster. [Dan L Lindsley; Georgianna G Zimm] The genetic variations of Drosophila melanogaster / D.L.

Lindsley and E.H. Grell. Description: viii, pages, 8 unnumbered leaves of plates: illustrations ; 29 cm Book\/a>, schema. An initial survey of DNA sequence variation at the Sod locus was carried out several years ago ().A region 1, bp long was sequenced in 41 lines of D. melanogaster from localities in California and Barcelona, and included 19 sequences coding for the Slow form of the enzyme and 22 coding for the Fast allele.

This sampling of approximately equal numbers of Slow and Fast alleles was done so. Find a huge variety of new & used Drosophila melanogaster books online including bestsellers & rare titles at the best prices. Shop Drosophila melanogaster books at Alibris.

Drosophila Genetics: A Ulrich Graf, Nancy Van Schaik Buy from $ Genetic variations of Dan L Lindsley, E H Grell Buy from $ Abstract. The genetic component of variation of enzyme activity in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated by using two sets of chromosome substitution lines.

The constitution of a line of each type is: i 1 /i 1;+ 2 / + 2;i 3 /i 3 and i 1 /i 1;i 2 / i 2;+ 3 /+ 3, where i refers to a chromosome from a highly inbred line and + refers to a chromosome from a natural by: Drosophila melanogaster was first used in the early ’s by William Castle to study embryology.

T.H Morgan saw what Castle was doing with the fruit flies and began to use them as well. While studying Drosophila, Morgan found his first white eye mutant which lead to the rediscovery of Mendelian genetics and expanded on Mendel’s work. Here we quantified genome-wide pdf in gene expression in the sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), increasing the annotated Drosophila transcriptome by 11%, including thousands of novel transcribed regions (NTRs).Cited by:   Seven isogenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster were assayed for oviposition preference on food with download pdf (PTC) versus plain food.

There was significant variation among strains for the percentage of eggs oviposited on each medium, ranging from 70±4% (SE) preference for plain food to no significant preference.

Reciprocal hybrid, backcross, and F2 Cited by:   Drosophila melanogaster, an ebook African ebook, has recently spread throughout the world, associated with human activity.

The species has served as the focus of many studies investigating local adaptation relating to latitudinal variation in non-African populations, especially those from the United States and Australia.

These studies have documented the existence of shared Cited by: